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Coolest Homemade Rock'em Sock'em Robots Couple Halloween Costume 6

by Kim R.
(Columbus, Ohio, USA)

Homemade Rock'em Sock'em Robots Couple Halloween Costume at the School Party

Homemade Rock'em Sock'em Robots Couple Halloween Costume at the School Party

Homemade Rock'em Sock'em Robots Couple Halloween Costume at the School Party
Original Mock-ups of Chest and Sleeves
Rock'em Sock'em Action Shot
Finished Look Prior to Painting

After searching everywhere for a great costume for my twin 8-year old boys, I was very fortunate and found coolest-homemade-costumes.com. I was thrilled at seeing so many creative and original ideas and our family was inspired to make our own. We enjoyed many of the costumes shown here, but decided to go with a homemade Rock'em Sock'em Robots couple Halloween costume, a toy we all love, and for twins, it's perfect.

We saw three versions of Rock'em Sock'em Robots on the site, but none were just right in achieving our personal trick-or treat goals of mobility, warmth, and unimpaired vision. We decided to make them from rolls of 1/2" upholstery foam purchased from a local fabric store and assembled all the pieces with a hot glue gun.

Starting with the chest piece and sleeves, we quickly saw the process would work, and developed the patterns to look as much like the original toy design as possible. Using a Sharpie marker, we drew the patterns onto the foam and cut them out with an X-acto knife (for straight cuts) and scissors (for all curves).

The chest is one piece with a hole for the head, and glued along the two sides. Sleeves and pant legs are three pieces: a curved "elbow-shaped" outer piece, a long rectangular piece to wrap along it's edge, and a second "elbow-shaped" interior piece with a cut out for inserting your arm or leg. The feet/boots are attached to the leg pieces with hot glue, and after some experimentation, we added in a small rectangular piece that is hidden so that the boots rest on the wearer's actual shoes. The helmet is made of one long rectangular piece and glued to a circle at the top so that the basic form is like a straight-sided bucket. Large eye and mouth holes are cut into this, and additional foam was used to add dimension for the nose and chin, etc.

Decorative rivets were made from pre-cut craft foam and hot-glued in stacks to get a good amount of depth, the glued to the arms and helmet to match the original toy. To keep the arms and legs in place, we made "garters" out of elastic tape and plastic clasps which were purchased from the fabric store. Each arm had a piece of elastic tape with one end of the clasp hot glued in place, and we buckled them inside the chest piece to hide them.

Each of the legs have a short piece of elastic tape which is then connected to a longer open piece that has the two plastic clasps, and is buckled around the wearer's waist. The gloves are made from one long rectangle folded over for the knuckles. On the underside of each glove is a "bracket" for your wrist, and a "handle" that you hold onto with your fingers. By clasping the "handle", it makes the rectangular piece look like the original toy's square boxing gloves, but also allows your real hands to be free when necessary.

After assembling all the pieces, we painted them using custom matched latex applied with an electric spray paint gun (we tried canned spray paint and brushing on the latex, but neither worked well. Brushing soaked up too much paint making drying time way too long, and spray paint left a chemical aroma that was unsafe).

It took about a week of work due to the amount of time we spent working out the patterns, but it was a fun experience for our whole family, and the boys loved them. They were the hit of the neighborhood and at school, and I know we'll enjoy the costumes for a long time to come.

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